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Book Reviews
Programming Microsoft Outlook and Microsoft Exchange, 2nd edition (Microsoft Press)
by Mitch Tulloch
This second edition of Thomas Rizzo's popular book has been updated with new information on Outlook 2000, Exchange 2000, and Microsoft's Digital Dashboard. 

Rizzo's book is probably the definitive book for anyone wanting to develop collaborative solutions using Outlook and Exchange. After covering the basics of folders, fields, views, forms, and VBScript, Rizzo walks the reader through the development of a simple account tracking application in chapter 6 that is based on Outlook 98 and Exchange 5.5. He then moves on to consider Outlook Today and how to customize the HTML behind this feature of Outlook 98/2000. 

Chapter 8 focuses on the new features of Outlook 2000 as a development platform, and has many useful examples of VBA code. He then covers the Outlook Team Folders wizard, an add-in for Outlook 2000 that can be used to build turnkey collaborative applications based on Outlook 2000 and Exchange. The account tracking application of chapter 6 is then revisited in chapter 10 to add Outlook 2000-specific enhancements. 

Chapters 11 and 12 cover Digital Dashboards and Collaboration Data Objects (CDO) in a fair amount of detail. Chapter 13 explains the Event Scripting Agent of Exchange 5.5 and how this can be utilized, and the chapter that follows covers Exchange Server routing objects, an extension to the scripting agent. 

Chapter 15 covers programming Exchange Server using ADSI, and the following chapter enhancing Exchange applications using COM components. Chapter 17 digresses to look at search solutions using Site Server 3 (although I hear from a colleague who works with Site Server that this product will soon be defunct).

The book ends with a preview look at developing with Exchange 2000, including using its built-in XML support. 

This book is easy to read and the code examples are numerous and well-documented. If you have a fair knowledge of VB and its variants, it should be easy to follow and should get you up and running quickly in building Outlook/Exchange collaborative apps.

I give this book 5 stars out of five.

You can find this book on Amazon here

Do YOU have an opinion about this book?  Let me know!
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Disclaimer: Your use of the information contained in these pages is at your sole risk. All information on these pages is provided "as is", without any warranty, whether express or implied, of its accuracy, completeness, fitness for a particular purpose, title or non-infringement, and none of the third-party products or information mentioned in the work are authored, recommended, supported or guaranteed by Stephen Bryant or Pro Exchange. OutlookExchange.Com, Stephen Bryant and Pro Exchange shall not be liable for any damages you may sustain by using this information, whether direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, even if it has been advised of the possibility of such damages.

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